Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Actually, Not. Those Are Not Spices in My Curry. (Annapurna Circuit, Day Two)

We followed the Marhyangdi river
Date: April 23, 2011
Start: Jagat
Finish: Dharapani
Distance:  18 km
Elevation:  1860 (climb 620 m)


Because we liked the two hours of day one’s trekking, day two should have been even better – it had more than three times as much walking.  Taking breakfast at 6:30 we started at 7:36 and walked until 3:15 PM.  It was a long day that took us through more canyons, along a riverbed and over rickety steel wire bridges.  We saw our first donkey train, wearing colorful headdresses and carrying any goods needed beyond the end of the jeep trail.  At first they were cute.  But they soon became an annoyance, taking up most of the trail, and leaving smelly poop (gew, in Nepali) along their way.
On the road again
The somewhat stable steel bridges on the Annapurna Ciruict
The wide bed of the Marshyangdi
The best named trash can in Nepal.
Everestank:  Ever-stank?  Everest Tank?  However you pronounce it, we loved it.
Around lunch I began to feel slightly queasy.  My stomach was hurting and we still had hours of walking ahead of us.  At lunch I had no interest in my “bean, potato, veg, pumpkin curry (including corn bread).”  Jesse immediately knew something was wrong.  With everyone demanding that I force some of the food down, I took a bite or two before noticing that some of the large spices in the dish had legs, and that so did all of the smaller spices!  A brief investigation revealed the entire dish was covered in bugs.  This did not enhance my appetite.  Left to nibble on the corn bread, I sat and felt sorry for myself.  After lunch I fought through the next two hours of walking to make it to Dharapani without incident.

Looking good, but feeling bad before my bug-spiced bean, potato, veg, pumpkin curry

Two Tylenol PMs later I was passed out in my sleeping bag.  It was only 6:30 PM.  Hours later I woke up nauseous.  Actually, I woke up because I had already begun vomiting.  With my mouth filled, I stumbled out of my sleeping bag and crashed into the door.  Unbeknownst to me it was latched at the top, and despite my frantic clawing and scratching it didn’t budge.  And with more vomit coming up, I had no choice and threw up all over the door and floor in the front of our room.  My greatest concern was that I had just thrown-up in the shoes we were planning on walking in for 7-8 hours a day for the next ten days.  Thankfully, I (mostly) missed.  Just a small chuck landed squarely in the bottom of Jesse’s shoe.


In the brief period of calm between the first and second waves of vomit I managed to get the door open and leaned on the railing of the second floor balcony.  Due to a serious concern about the structural integrity of the railing at the Green Park Greenhouse, I rested as gently as I could while I violently threw up two more times.


Actual puke splatter pattern.
You can see that this was forceful vomiting.
Puke re-enactment (second wave)
When I was done puking Jesse prescribed me a course of Cipro, handfuls of Pepto-Bismal, and large quantities of painkillers and I slept until our 6 AM wake-up.  [JLM:  While Dave slept, I dutifully cleaned up the vomit as best I could with my valuable stash of toilet paper.  Then I proclaimed myself Wife of the Year.]


In the morning Shiba reviewed the proper method for using a Nepali toilet

The bathrooms at the tea houses were always interesting.
Here, Ted brushes his teeth at the stand-alone sink (without running water) and bottle recycling area.
Looking at the sink it occurs to me that perhaps it was also trash and going to be recycled along with the bottles...
Supertrekkers ready for another day.
Thanks to Ted for taking all group photos and never using the timer

1 comment:

  1. Oh you poor thing (both of you)!!! Hard to believe we were in Vegas for Darren's birthday* on that exact date...just a bit different in terms of accommodations, plumbing, etc.

    *I think it was someone else's birthday too...hmm, who could that have been?

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